A Comparison of Elements of Style-Quranic Stylistics Part 2

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A Comparison of Elements of Style-Quranic Stylistics Part 2

Postby dralmenoar2006 » Wed Oct 28, 2009 3:53 am

ABSTRACT

This Part 2 analysis is an attempt to create an awareness of the linguistic features present in the English language translations of the meaning of the Quran. A comparative stylistics analysis of verses 23-50 was done to two of the same Meccan (seventy-seventh)surah , Al-Mursalat, from two versions of the English translated versions of the Quran : The Message of the Quran- by Muhammad Asad and The Holy Quran- by Abdullah Yusuf Ali.

Part 2
INTRODUCTION

This paper is the second part of a two part analysis. The two parts are:
A Comparison of Elements of Style in Quranic Stylistics Part1. It deals with the stylistics analysis of verses 1-22 of surah Al-Mursalat.
A Comparison of Elements of Style in Quranic Stylistics Part2. It deals with the stylistics analysis of verses 23-50 of surah Al-Mursalat.
This writer will highlight the differences and similarities of the seventy-seventh surah from The Message of the Quran -English language translation of the meaning of the Quran by Muhammad Asad and The Holy Quran -English language translation of the meaning of the Quran by Abdullah Yusuf Ali.
Each verse translated by each translator is put one after another. Each verse from the seventy-seventh surah, Al-Mursalat, translated by Muhammad Asad is marked (B) by MA and is put first, followed by the same verse translated by Abdullah Yusuf Ali which is marked (B) by AYA. This writer then looks closely at each translator’s style of translating the same original text (the Quran) while examining the language features.
(B) by MA
(23) Thus have We determined [the nature of man's creation]: and excellent indeed is Our power to determine [what is to be]!
(B) by AYA
23. For We do determine
For We
Are the Best to determine (things).


Analysis: The word "determine" is used twice in both translated versions. "We" is used in both translated versions to refer to God and to exclude the reader. This writer feels that Muhammad Asad has made a difference for the sake of clarity with his additions of the words in []. Abdullah Yusuf Ali, on the other hand, in his attempt to clarify by adding “(things)”, has still left it vague. Both translated versions put across the same effect of meaning that God determines the life and death of man and thus God will rightfully determine life after the Day of Judgement. Verse twenty-three of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They confirm that Allah is the rightful Determiner of life and death.
(B) by MA
(24) Woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth!

(B) by AYA
24. Ah woe, that Day!
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: Verse twenty-four is the same warning to the disbelievers. This warning is repeated for the third time. In Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version, there is a slight punctuation difference in that after the word Day, there is an exclamation mark - "Day!" whereas the other times when this warning is repeated, the word Day is followed by a comma - "Day,". Verse twenty-four of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They call out to the disbelievers to prepare for the Day of Judgement. (Refer to verse fifteen for a more complete analysis)
(B) by MA
(25) Have We not caused the earth to hold within itself (26) the living and the dead? (27) and have We not set on it proud, firm mountains, and given you sweet water to drink?

(B) by AYA
25. Have We not made
The earth (as a place)
To draw together.
26. The living and the dead,
27. And made therein
Mountains standing firm,
Lofty (in statue);
And provided for you
Water sweet (and wholesome)?


Analysis: Muhammad Asad puts verses twenty-five to twenty-seven in one paragraph whereas Abdullah Yusuf Ali puts the verses numbered one after another. These arrangements put forth the narrative prosaic style of Muhammad Asad and the poetic-like style of Abdullah Yusuf Ali. Verses twenty-five to twenty-seven of both translated versions do not differ much in meaning. They describe what God has let man see for himself which should help man to appreciate His creations and acknowledge His existence.
(B) by MA
(25) Have We not caused the earth to hold within itself

(B) by AYA
25. Have We not made
The earth (as a place)
To draw together


Analysis: Verse twenty-five is in the past tense in both translated versions. "We" is used in both translated versions to refer to God and to exclude the reader. Verse twenty-five is part of a question in both translated versions and start the question with the same few words - "Have We not ......". The “caused” and “made” in Muhammad Asad’s version and Abdullah Yusuf Ali’s version respectively, are used in a passive structure. Because they are used in a question, it is not as clear as if they are put in this way- We have caused….. and We have made….Verse twenty-five of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They remind man to look at the earth as a place where both life and death happen, one leading to the other.
(B) by MA
(26) the living and the dead?

(B) by AYA
26. The living and the dead,


Analysis: Muhammad Asad forms the question in verse twenty-six whereas Abdullah Yusuf Ali forms the question only in verse twenty-seven. Both translated versions have used exactly the same words in verse twenty - six. Verse twenty-six of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They look again at both life and death happening on earth.
(B) by MA
(27) and have We not set on it proud, firm mountains, and given you sweet water to drink?

(B) by AYA
27. And made therein
Mountains standing firm,
Lofty (in stature);
And provided for you
Water sweet (and wholesome)?


Analysis: Muhammad Asad begins verse twenty-seven with the conjunction "and" to form the second question in this paragraph. Abdullah Yusuf Ali completes his only question in verses twenty-five to twenty-seven and also begins verse twenty-seven with the conjunction "and". Rhyme occurs in the second line - "firm" and last line - "wholesome" in verse twenty - seven in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. Both translated versions describe the mountains that God has created as "firm" mountains to denote hardness, solid, rock mountains. The high altitude of these mountains is described as "proud" by means of using the description of an attitude or behaviour by Muhammad Asad and "Lofty (in stature) by means of using the description of a physique by Abdullah Yusuf Ali. God has given man sweet water from these mountains in form of rivers and springs to drink. Verse twenty-seven of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They bring to light the fact that something as dead as mountains is able to function on earth to produce sweet, pure water for man who is alive to drink and to keep man alive.
(B) by MA
(28) Woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth!

(B) by AYA
28. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: This warning to the disbelievers is repeated for the fourth time in both translated versions. Verse twenty-eight of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They call out to disbelievers to approach the right path and repent in humility. (Refer to verse fifteen for a more complete analysis)
(B) by MA
(29) GO ON towards that [resurrection] which you were wont to call a lie!

(B) by AYA
29. (It will be said:)
"Depart ye to that
Which ye used to reject
As false!


Analysis: Verse twenty-nine marks a new section in Muhammad Asad's version. Abdullah Yusuf Ali does not mark the above verse as a new section. Both translated versions address the disbelievers to tell them what awaits them if they continue to deny the truth. "You" is used to refer to the disbelievers in Muhammad Asad's version and "ye" is used to refer to the disbelievers in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version, the former adhering to Modern English and the latter adhering to Classical English. Muhammad Asad atttempts to clarify with “[resurrection]” which does make a difference. Abdullah Yusuf Ali adds “(It will be said)” before the opening of a speech but this writer feels his addition is redundant. Verse twenty-nine is not in speech form in Muhammad Asad's version whereas in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version, verse twenty-nine is in speech form. Verse twenty-nine of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They tell the disbelievers that their destination is Hell if they continue to reject the Truth.
(B) by MA
(30) Go on towards the threefold shadow(31) that will offer no [cooling] shade and will be of no avail against the flame (32) which - behold! will throw up sparks like [burning] logs, (33) like giant fiery ropes!

(B) by AYA
30. "Depart ye to a shadow
(Of smoke ascending)
In three columns,
31. "(Which yields) no shade
Of coolness, and is
Of no use against
The fierce Blaze.
32. "Indeed it throws about
Sparks (huge) as Forts,
33. "As if there were
(A string of) yellow camels
(Marching swiftly)."


Analysis: Muhammad Asad puts verses thirty to thirty-three in one paragraph whereas Abdullah Yusuf Ali puts them numbered one after another. These arrangements put forth the narrative prosaic style of Muhammad Asad and the poetic-like style of Abdullah Yusuf Ali. Verses twenty-nine to thirty-three are not in speech form in Muhammad Asad's version whereas in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version, these verses are in speech form.
(B) by MA
(30) Go on towards the threefold shadow

(B) by AYA
30. "Depart ye to a Shadow
(Of smoke Ascending)
In three columns,


Analysis: Both translated versions use the word "shadow" which the sinners will see in hell. Abdullah Yusuf Ali describes it further - "Shadow (of smoke ascending)”. Muhammad Asad, on other hand, makes no mention of smoke. Both translated versions mention the number three but in different ways - "threefold shadow" by Muhammad Asad and "three columns" by Abdullah Yusuf Ali. According to the Oxford dictionary, column means a vertical, cylindrical mass of liquid or vapour and shadow means a dark figure projected by something or someone intercepting rays of light. Given this, this writer feels that “columns” in Abdullah Yusuf Ali’s version adds more information by giving shape to the smoke. On the other hand, with the use of “shadows”, both versions manage to give that dark, scary, mysterious effect. Verse thirty of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They give a picture of Hell as a burning, hot, dark place fogged up with smoke.
(B) by MA
(31)Will offer no [cooling] shades and will be of no avail against the flame

(B) by AYA
31. "(Which yields) no shade
Of coolness, and is
Of no use against
The fierce Blaze.


Analysis: Similar words are used in both translated versions - "no [cooling] shade" by Muhammad Asad and "no shade of coolness "by Abdullah Yusuf Ali. The fire in Hell is described as "the flame" in Muhammad Asad's version and "the fierce Blaze" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. Both translated versions are clear in meaning but use different expressions - "offer" in Muhammad Asad's version and "yields" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version, "of no avail" in Muhammad Asad's version and "of no use" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. Verse thirty-one of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They tell more about Hell which has shadows that offer no coolness, comfort or shade.
(B) by MA
(32) which- behold! will throw up sparks like [burning] logs,

(B) by AYA
32. "Indeed it throws about
Sparks (huge) as Forts,


Analysis: Both translated versions use metaphors to describe the sparks - "like [burning] logs" in Muhammad Asad's version and "(huge) as Forts" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. Both translated versions use idioms to describe the effect of the sparks bursting into the air - "throw up" in Muhammad Asad's version and "throws about" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. “Up” gives Muhammad Asad’s description height whereas “about” is more vague, it could mean everywhere-up, down and sideways in Abdullah Yusuf Ali’s version. Verse thirty-two of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They describe the size of the huge sparks in Hell continuously bursting into the air.
(B) by MA
(33) like giant fiery ropes

(B) by AYA
33. "As if there were
(A string of) yellow camels
(Marching swiftly)."


Analysis: Both translated versions continue to describe the fire in Hell by using different metaphors - "like giant fiery ropes" in Muhammad Asad's version and "As if there were (A string of) yellow camels (Marching swiftly)." in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. Verse thirty-three of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They continue to describe the huge sparks. This time giving them colour and shape.
(B) by MA
(34) Woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth - (35) that Day on which they will not [be able to] utter a word, (36) nor be allowed to proffer excuses!

(B) by AYA
34. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!
35. That will be a Day
When they shall not
Be able to speak,
36. Nor will it be
Open to them
To put forth pleas.


Analysis: Muhammad Asad puts verses thirty-four to thirty-six in one paragraph whereas Abdullah Yusuf Ali puts the verses numbered one after another. These arrangements put forth the narrative prosaic style of Muhammad Asad and the poetic-like style of Abdullah Yusuf Ali.
(B) by MA
(34) Woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth !

(B) by AYA
34. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: This warning to the disbelievers is repeated for the fifth time. Verse thirty-four of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They call out to disbelievers to believe and prepare for the Day of Judgement that is bound to come. (Refer to verse fifteen for a more complete analysis)
(B) by MA
(35) that Day on which they will not [be able to] utter a word,

(B) by AYA
35. That will be a Day
When they shall not
Be able to speak,


Analysis: Both translated versions use similar word - "not [be able to] utter a word in Muhammad Asad's version and "not Be able to speak" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version .The addition in Muhammad Asad’s version in [] makes a lot of difference in explaining that the sinners will not utter a word, not because they do not want to but because God will not let them. Abdullah Yusuf Ali, on the other hand, manages to put this across without any extra help. Both translated versions begin verse thirty-five with "that". Verse thirty-five of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They tell that excuses will not be entertained.
(B) by MA
(36) nor be allowed to proffer excuses!

(B) by AYA
36. Nor will it be
Open to them
To put forth pleas.


Analysis: Both translated versions begin with the conjunction "nor". Different expressions are used - "to proffer excuses!" in Muhammad Asad's version and "to put forth pleas" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. According to the Oxford dictionary, proffer means to give and excuses is commonly used for reasons to defend oneself. In Abdullah Yusuf Ali’s version, “pleas” is used to mean the defence for more serious offences. “Pleas” is usually used in the court of law and thus, Abdullah Yusuf Ali has used the language of the law in this instance. Verse thirty-six of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They further tell that there will be no opportunity for pleas.
(B) by MA
(37) Woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth - (38) that Day of Distinction [between the true and the false, when they will be told]: "We have brought you together with those [sinners] of olden times;(39) and if you [think that you] have a subterfuge left, try to outwit Me!"

(B) by AYA
37. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!
38. That will be a Day
Of Sorting Out! We shall
Gather you together
And those before (you)!
39. Now, if ye have
A trick (or plot),
Use it against Me!


Analysis: Muhammad Asad puts verses thirty-seven to thirty-nine to form one paragraph whereas Abdullah Yusuf Ali puts them numbered one after another. These arrangements put forth the narrative prosaic style of Muhammad Asad and the poetic-like style of Abdullah Yusuf Ali.
(B) by MA
(37) Woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth -

(B) by AYA
37. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: This warning to the disbelievers is repeated for the sixth time. Verse thirty-seven of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They call out to disbelievers to turn to Allah in humility and repent. (Refer to verse fifteen for a more complete analysis)
(B) by MA
(38) that Day of Distinction [between the true and the false, when they will be told]; "We have brought you together with those [sinners] of olden times;

(B) by AYA
38. That will be a Day
Of Sorting Out! We shall
Gather you together
And those before (you)!


Analysis: Both translated versions use "We" to refer to God, excluding the reader. In Muhammad Asad’s version, “you” to refer to the disbelievers, adhering to Modern English. Abdullah Yusuf Ali, on the other hand, does not adhere to Classical English in this instance with the use of “you”, aiming to separate one from his ancestors. The Day of Judgement is described as "Day of Distinction" in Muhammad Asad's version and "Day of Sorting out" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version.Verse thirty-eight of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They tell that even with all the wisdom one and one's ancestors possess, all put together, cannot defeat Allah and His plan and His wisdom.
(B) by MA
(39) and if you [think that you] have a subterfuge left, try to outwit Me!"

(B) by AYA
39. Now, if ye have
A trick (or plot),
Use it against Me!


Analysis: Muhammad Asad uses "you" to refer to the disbelievers in verses thirty-eight and thirty-nine, adhering to Modern English. Abdullah Yusuf Ali uses "you" to refer to the disbelievers in verse thirty-eight, making a distinction between one and his ancestors and "ye" to refer to the disbelievers in verse thirty-nine, adhering to Classical English. Different expressions are used - "Subterfuge" in Muhammad Asad's version and "A trick (or plot)" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. According to the Oxford dictionary, subterfuge means to avoid blame or defeat by lying or deceit which means that Abdullah Yusuf Ali used more common words in this verse- “a trick (or plot)”. Muhammad Asad uses "outwit Me!" and Abdullah Yusuf Ali uses "Use it against Me!". “Me” refers to God and aims to evoke a formal tone. Verse thirty-eight and thirty-nine appear in speech form in Muhammad Asad's version whereas in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version the verses do not appear in speech form. Verse thirty-nine of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They challenge man to try to defeat Allah.
(B) by MA
(40) Woe on that Day unto those who the give lie to the truth-

(B) by AYA
40. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: This warning to the disbelievers is repeated for the seventh time. Verse forty of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They call out to disbelievers to prepare for the Day of Judgement. (Refer to verse fifteen for a more complete analysis)
(B) by MA
(41) [AS AGAINST this,] behold, the God-conscious shall dwell amidst [cooling] shades and springs, (42) and [partake of] whatever fruit they may desire; (43) [and they will be told:] "Eat and drink in good cheer in return for what you did [in life]!"

(B) by AYA
SECTION 2

41. As to the Righteous,
They shall be amidst
(Cool) shades and springs
(Of water).
42. And (they shall have)
Fruits, - all they desire.
43. "Eat ye and drink ye
To your heart's content:
For that ye worked
(Righteousness).


Analysis: Muhammad Asad puts verses forty-one to forty-three to form one paragraph. Abdullah Yusuf Ali puts them numbered one after another. These arrangements put forth the narrative prosaic style of Muhammad Asad and the poetic-like style of Abdullah Yusuf Ali. Verse forty-one marks a new section in Muhammad Asad's version. Verse forty-one marks the beginning of Section 2 in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version.
(B) by MA
(41) [AS AGAINST this,] behold, the God-conscious shall dwell amidst [cooling] shades and springs,

(B) by AYA
41. As to the Righteous,
They shall be amidst
(Cool) shades and springs
(Of water).


Analysis: Both translated versions begin verse forty-one with "as". In other words, as opposed to the sinners, the believers are promised "[cooling] shades and springs" in Muhammad Asad's version and "(Cool) shades and springs (of water)" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's versions. Verse forty-one of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They show the contrast of sinners in Hell and the righteous in Paradise with cooling shades and springs.
(B) by MA
(42) and [partake of] whatever fruit they may desire;

(B) by AYA
42. And (they shall have)
Fruits, - all they desire.


Analysis: Both translated versions begin with the conjunction "and" to provide cohesion. Both translators attempt to clarify further. Muhammad Asad used “[partake of] “ to emphasize the abundance of fruits; the righteous will not be able to consume all the fruits available instead they will consume only part of all the fruits that they desire to consume. Abdullah Yusuf Ali translates this more literally. Basically, similar words are used in verse forty-two for both translated versions. Verse forty-two of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They tell that the righteous will further be rewarded with an abundance of fruits.
(B) by MA
(43) [and they will be told:] "Eat and drink in good cheer in return for what you did [in life]!"

(B) by AYA
43. "Eat ye and drink ye
To your heart's content:
For that ye worked
(Righteousness).


Analysis: Muhammad Asad uses "you" to refer to the believers, adhering to Modern English whereas Abdullah Yusuf Ali uses "ye" to refer to the believers, adhering to Classical English. Both translated version are in speech form for verse forty-three however, Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version does not mark the closing of the speech at the end of verse forty-three. Different vocabulary is used - "in good cheer" by Muhammad Asad and "to your heart's content" by Abdullah Yusuf Ali; both translators try to capture the inner feelings by these words.Verse forty-three of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They tell that as a symbolism of the joys of paradise, the righteous are left to eat and drink as much as they desire.
(B) by MA
(44)Thus, behold, do We reward the doers of good; (45) [but] woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth!

(B) by AYA
44. Thus do We certainly
Reward the Doers of Good.
45. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: Muhammad Asad's version puts verses forty-four and forty-five to form one paragraph. Abdullah Yusuf Ali puts them numbered one after another. These arrangements put forth the narrative prosaic style of Muhammad Asad and the poetic-like style of Abdullah Yusuf Ali.
(B) by MA
(44) Thus, behold, do We reward the doers of good;

(B) by AYA
44. Thus do We certainly
Reward the Doers of Good.


Analysis: Both translated versions begin verse forty-four with the conjunction "Thus" to carry the causal concept in a formal way. "We" is used to refer to God and to exclude the reader in both translated versions. Basically, both translated versions use exactly the same words in this verse and do not differ much in meaning. This verse underscores the way the believers will surely be rewarded. Verse forty-four of both versions carry the fact that the righteous will indeed be rewarded.
(B) by MA
(45) [but] woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth!

(B) by AYA
45. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: This warning to the disbelievers is repeated for the eighth time. Muhammad Asad uses the conjunction "[but]" to begin this verse. Verse forty-five of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They call out to disbelievers to turn to Allah for repentance. (Refer to verse fifteen for a more complete analysis)
(B) by MA
(46) EAT [your fill] and enjoy your life for a little while, O you who are lost in sin! (47) [But] woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth,(48) and when they are told, "Bow down [before God]", do not bow down: (49) woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth!

(B) by AYA
46. ( O ye Unjust!)
Eat ye and enjoy yourselves
(But ) a little while,
For that ye are Sinners.
47. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!
48. And when it is said
To them, "Prostrate yourselves!"
They do not so.
49. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: In Muhammad Asad's version, verse forty-six marks a new section and verses forty-six to forty-nine are put in one paragraph. Abdullah Yusuf Ali puts the verses numbered one after another. These arrangements put forth the narrative prosaic style of Muhammad Asad and the poetic-like style of Abdullah Yusuf Ali.
(B) by MA
(46) EAT [your fill] and enjoy your life for a little while, O you who are lost in sin!

(B) by AYA
46. (O ye Unjust! )
Eat ye and enjoy yourselves
(But) a little while,
For that ye are Sinners.


Analysis: Muhammad Asad address the disbelievers as " O you who are lost in sin!" whereas Abdullah Yusuf Ali uses "O ye Unjust!" to address the disbelievers. The order in which the words appear differs in the two translated versions. Muhammad Asad addresses the disbelievers later in the verse whereas Abdullah Yusuf Ali addresses the disbelievers at the beginning of the verse. This writer feels that Muhammad Asad manages to say it all in one go – in address and explanation at the end of the verse. Abdullah Yusuf Ali, on the other hand, calls the disbelievers “unjust” in the beginning and later calls them sinners at the end of the verse. Verse forty-six of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They tell that the reward for the righteous is continuous contentment in this life and in the hereafter but the sinners will suffer and be punished when all good things will come to an evil end.
(B) by MA
(47) [But] woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth,

(B) by AYA
47. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: This warning to the disbelievers is repeated for the ninth time. Muhammad Asad begins this verse with the conjunction "[But]". Verse forty-seven of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They call out to disbelievers to prepare for the Day that is bound to come. (Refer to verse fifteen for a more complete analysis)
(B) by MA
(48) and when they are told, "Bow down [before God]", do not bow down:

(B) by AYA
48. And when it is said
To them, "Prostrate yourselves!"
They do not so.


Analysis: Both translated versions have speech in them - "Bow down [before God]" in Muhammad Asad's version and "Prostate yourselves!" in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. Muhammad Asad uses more common words “bow down” and attempts to clarify further by using [ before God]. Abdullah Yusuf Ali, on the other hand, uses “prostrate” which is a word usually used only in the context of performance in prayers. Verse forty-eight of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They tell that the disbelievers refuse to prostrate in humility for forgiveness and repentance towards Allah.
(B) by MA
(49) Woe on that Day unto those who give the lie to the truth!

(B) by AYA
49. Ah woe, that Day,
To the Rejecters of Truth!


Analysis: This warning to the disbelievers is repeated for the tenth and last time. Verse forty-nine do not differ much in meaning. They call out to disbelievers to seek repentance toward Allah in preparation for the Day of Judgement. (Refer to verse fifteen for a more complete analysis)
(B) by MA
(50) In what other tiding, then, will they, after this, believe?

(B) by AYA
50. Then what Message,
After that,
Will they believe in?


Analysis: In Muhammad Asad's version, verse fifty appears in a new paragraph alone. In Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version, verse fifty is the last numbered verse. The conjunction "then" appears in the middle of the verse fifty Muhammad Asad's version whereas "then" appears to begin verse fifty in Abdullah Yusuf Ali's version. The “then” provides cohesion and carries the time concept. Both translated versions end with a question. "They" is used to refer to the disbelievers in both translated versions. Verse fifty of both versions do not differ much in meaning. They question what then would the disbelievers accept or believe in if not the Guidance from the Quran.

CONCLUSION

With regards to language and style variation, the language of the set of Meccan surah from The Message of the Quran - English language translation of the meaning of the Quran by Muhammad Asad is generally found to be Modern English, adult, religious - class, educated language. The language of the same set of Meccan surah from The Holy Quran - English language translation of the meaning of the Quran by Abdullah Yusuf Ali is generally found to be Classical English, adult, religious- class, educated language. For example, in verse seven of surah Al-Mursalat, the use of “ye” in (B) by AYA gives the Classical effect and the use of “you” in (B) by MA gives the Modern English effect.
The medium of the two sets of Meccan surah from the two versions of the English language translations of the meaning of the Quran is written language but they contain some representations of spoken language. For example, verse forty-eight of surah Al-Mursalat contains the speech of command directed to the disbelievers.
The tenor of the two sets of surah from the two versions is generally formal. However, there were instances where the tenor became informal, impolite. For example, in verse forty-eight of surah Al-Mursalat, the tenor involves impoliteness in the disobedience on the disbelievers’ part because the disbelievers did not comply with the order to prostrate before God.
The domain of language in verse forty-eight in (B) by AYA is using the language of religion and consequently, the language of instruction in religion with the word “prostrate”. The domain of language in (B) by AYA is using the language of the law with the word “pleas”. The domain is generally the language of instruction calling out for all to believe in Allah, His Messengers and the Day of Judgement. For example, in verse forty-nine of surah Al-Mursalat, this warning to the disbelievers is repeated for the tenth and last time. Verse forty-nine carries the language of instruction in calling out to disbelievers to seek repentance toward Allah in preparation for the Day of Judgement.
In both versions, there is accessibility in the language used especially in the descriptions of Paradise and Hell. For example, in verses thirty to thirty-three of surah Al-Mursalat carry the descriptions of Hell. The words used are accessible to the reader to help create a clear picture of Hell.

REFERENCES

Abdullah Yusuf Ali. The Holy Quran. Brentwood, Maryland:Amana Corp., 1983.

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